In the segment, In These Times executive editor Jessica Stites said that although there are many debt holders, it’s these vulture firms that are “fighting tooth and nail in court to try to get this money back”—and, along with the federal government, ignorning growing calls for debt relief.

“The financial firms have organized themselves into alliances to aid their quest to get paid,” the report explains. “And with the exception of the Mutual Fund Group, these big alliances are dominated by vulture funds.”

These alliances, as CPI’s Carla Minet told Democracy Now!, “have the same legal representation. Also, they have the same lobbies. They have the same public relations firms.”

This enables them to work together to try to recoup some money, even as the U.S. territory’s local government warns that it could run out of money by the end of October, and many of its 3.4 million residents remains without electricity, food, and water.

And although, as the report notes, “the bankruptcy proceedings have been postponed while the island recovers from the hurricane…. while most of the island has been offline, lawyers for the bondholders have not stopped digitally submitting motions in the bankruptcy case.”

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